Developmental Skills

Children progress in their ability to do new things as they get older. Babies and children with the 22q11.2 deletion may at times learn new skills at a slower rate than other children their age. We list below the sequence and ages when children generally acquire skills, so that you can let your child’s primary care provider know if your child is falling behind. Parents are often the first to notice subtle lags in their child’s development.

Developmental Milestones Reference Table

Developmental_Milestones_1-16mo

Created by: Chris Plauche Johnson, MD

Movement

  • When on stomach, raises head and chest
  • Opens and shuts hands
  • Brings hands to mouth
  • Swipes at toys

Visual

  • Watches faces
  • Follows objects or people
  • Interested in environment when awake

Communication

  • Smiles when hears a familiar voice
  • Vocalizes cooing sounds
  • Turns head toward sounds

Social Play

  • Cuddles
  • Enjoys being sung to
  • Gazes into face
  • Enjoys mobiles

Self Care

  • Needs cuddling
  • Lets you know when uncomfortable
  • Learns to calm self

Movement

  • Raises head and chest on stomach
  • Rolls and begins to sit
  • Reaches and grasps
  • Passes toys from hand to hand

 

Play

  • Looks for dropped toys
  • Explores toys in detail
  • Mouths, bangs and shakes toys
  • Communication
  • Responds to own name
  • Babbles and imitates sounds, laughs aloud
  • Responds to “no” half the time
  • Makes repetitive sounds like “baba”
  • School play
  • Enjoys peek-a-boo
  • Squeals with delight

 

Self Care

  • May hold bottle
  • Cries or makes sounds to request food
  • Gestures to get your attention
  • Imitates sounds and words
  • School play
  • Shy with strangers
  • Prefers primary caregiver
  • Repeats sounds or actions for attention

Movement

  • When on stomach, raises head and chest
  • Opens and shuts hands
  • Brings hands to mouth
  • Swipes at toys

Visual

  • Watches faces
  • Follows objects or people
  • Interested in environment when awake

Communication

  • Smiles when hears a familiar voice
  • Vocalizes cooing sounds
  • Turns head toward sounds

Social Play

  • Cuddles
  • Enjoys being sung to
  • Gazes into face
  • Enjoys mobiles

Self Care

  • Needs cuddling
  • Lets you know when uncomfortable
  • Learns to calm self

Movement

  • Walks well alone
  • Enjoys pull toys
  • Begins to run
  • Climbs stairs by crawling or using banister

Play

  • Scribbles
  • Builds tower of blocks
  • Enjoys shape sorters
  • Begins make-believe play

 

Communication

  • Uses 8 or more single words
  • Points to parts of body
  • Understand many words and follows two-part directions
  • Imitates words

 

Social Play

  • Hands toys to others than takes them back
  • Loves having an audience
  • Laughs at some funny things

 

Self Care

  • Feeds self with spoon
  • Finger feeds
  • Cooperates in dressing
  • Starts to switch from bottle to cup

Movement

  • Throws ball overhand
  • Rides tricycle
  • Hops on one foot
  • Jumps forward
  • Enjoys playground equipment

Thinking Skills

  • Draws a picture of a person
  • Uses scissors
  • Knows color names

Communication

  • Tells stories of recent experiences
  • Uses 6 word sentences
  • Understands concepts of big and little

Social Play

  • Considers some children special friends
  • Plays cooperatively with others
  • Takes turns

Self Care

  • Washes / dries hands and face
  • Uses spoons and fork
  • Likes a bedtime routine
  • Puts toys away

Movement

  • Somersaults
  • Climbs on playground equipment
  • Catches ball
  • Rides bike with training wheels

Thinking Skills

  • Plays simple board games
  • Memorizes ABC’s
  • Begins counting skills
  • Draws people with 6 parts
  • Copies circle and square

Communication

  • Can tell what happened
  • Asks questions
  • Uses full sentences
  • Defines familiar words

 

Social Play

  • Considers some children special friends
  • Plays cooperatively with others
  • Takes turns

Self Care

  • Dresses and undresses (except tying shoes)
  • Begin to learn manners
  • Washes self in tub

From birth to 5 years, your child should reach milestones in how he or she plays, learns, speaks, acts and moves. Track your child’s development and act early if you have a concern.

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